Beirut port operating at 80% capacity, three weeks after blast – sources

Beirut Container Terminal Consortium sources tell Arabian Business nearly 12,000 containers were unloaded between August 11-24

The container terminal and its equipment did not suffer significant damage by the huge explosion on August 4. Image: Getty Images

Three weeks after being decimated in an explosion, Beirut Port is operating at 80 percent of its capacity, with nearly 12,000 containers unloaded between August 11-24, sources have told Arabian Business.

The sources at Beirut Container Terminal Consortium (BCTC), which operates the terminal, said 30 freighters and 10 international ships docked during that period and around 70,000 tons of goods were imported through the port.

The container terminal and its equipment did not suffer significant damage by the huge explosion on August 4.

The Lebanese Armed Forces have successfully cleaned up the eastern port area damaged by the blast, which allowed three quays to become fully operational, along with a courtyard in the port.

Many shipping agencies out of more than 45 in the port have resumed operations, a source at the International Chamber of Navigation in Beirut told Arabian Business.

A huge stock of ammonium nitrate stored unsecured for years in the rundown warehouse at the Lebanese capital’s port exploded on August 4.

The blast caused severe damage across swathes of the city, killed at least 181 people and injured more than 6,500.

Lebanon has launched an investigation into the disaster, which many have blamed on official negligence and corruption.

So far arrest warrants have been issued for six of the 25 people currently facing lawsuits over the blast, including Beirut Port director-general Hassan Koraytem and customs director-general, Badri Daher.

While authorities have rebuffed widespread calls for an international probe, Lebanon’s investigation is being aided by foreign experts, including from the US Federal Bureau of Investigation.

France, which counted among the dead several of its citizens, has launched its own enquiry.

Arabian Business: why we're going behind a paywall

Source: Read Full Article